Last edited by Kagalabar
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

9 edition of Provincial readers in eighteenth-century England found in the catalog.

Provincial readers in eighteenth-century England

by Jan S. Fergus

  • 382 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Books and reading -- England -- Midlands -- History -- 18th century

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [284]-296) and indexes

    StatementJan Fergus
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsZ1003.5.G7 F47 2006
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 314 p. :
    Number of Pages314
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17229315M
    ISBN 100199297827
    ISBN 109780199297825
    LC Control Number2007295842

    The Lunar Society of Birmingham: A Social History of Provincial Science and Industry in Eighteenth-century England. Robert E. Schofield. Clarendon Press, - England - pages. 1 Review. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review.5/5(1).   Professor Kate Flint explores the way Victorians bought, borrowed and read their books, and considers the impact of the popular literature of the period. Victorians were great readers of the novel, and the number of novels available for them to read increased enormously during Victoria’s reign. The activity of reading benefited hugely from.

      Both of these major studies of the eighteenth-century book trade aim to complicate current understandings of the distinction between respectable and unrespectable literary production and consumption, in a century that saw little technological advance in book production but a great deal of activity in the promotion of books through newspapers and Author: Tom Jones.   Abigail Williams, a Professor in the English Faculty and Fellow at St Peter’s College, has written The Social Life of Books: Reading Together in the Eighteenth-Century Home.. The book offers new insights into how books were used by their 18th Century readers, and the part they have played in middle-class homes and families, knitting people together, .

    Reading the Scottish Enlightenment: Books and their Readers in Provincial Scotland, – By Mark R. M. Towsey. Pp. xvi+ ISBN: (hbk).Author: Alexander Murdoch. ←Books published in the 18th century → s books Subcategories. This category has the following 17 subcategories, out of 17 total.


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Provincial readers in eighteenth-century England by Jan S. Fergus Download PDF EPUB FB2

Many scholars have written about 18th-century English novels, but no one really knows who read them. This study provides historical data on the provincial reading publics for various forms of fiction — novels, plays, chapbooks, children's books, and magazines.

Archival records of Midland booksellers based in five market towns and selling printed matter to over thirty-three hundred Author: Jan Fergus. This book thus offers the first solid demographic information about actual readership in eighteenth-century provincial England, not only about the class, profession, age, and sex of readers but also about the market of available fiction from which they made their choices--and some speculation about why they made the choices they by: Many scholars have written about eighteenth-century English novels, but no one really knows who read them.

This study provides historical data on the provincial reading publics for various forms of fiction--novels, plays, chapbooks, children's books, and magazines.

This book thus offers the first solid demographic information about actual readership in 18th-century provincial England, not only about the class, profession, Provincial readers in eighteenth-century England book, and sex of readers. Relish for Reading in Provincial England Two Centuries Ago," in The Widening Circle: Essays on the Circulation of Literature in Eighteenth-Century Europe, ed.

Paul J. Korshin (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, ), pp. Eighteenth-century objections to the novel as trashy, even poisonous, are fully al. Cambridge Core - English Literature - The Provincial Book Trade in Eighteenth-Century England - by John Feather Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our : John Feather.

If provincial readers could be generally satisfied with schoolbooks, part books, and magazines printed in London, along with chapbooks and ballads from "local sources" (p.

), then they were largely cut off from the cultural life represented by the hundreds of books published every year in London.1 The London book trade, conse. It was not until the eighteenth century that books became widely available throughout the whole of England.

Publishing remained largely London-based, but the provincial market grew steadily in. The protagonists in both the series of historical mysteries I have written are members of a new force in eighteenth-century British society: ‘persons of the middling sort’ or members of the professional and mercantile middle classes.

Mr Ashmole Foxe is a wealthy bookseller and property owner; Dr Adam Bascom is a physician and younger son of a member. Buy Provincial Readers in Eighteenth-Century England by Fergus, Jan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday Author: Jan Fergus. This chapter discusses the proliferation of newspapers outside the capital in the eighteenth century and questions the assumption that provincial papers were small-scale, amateurish, and merely regurgitated versions of their London counterparts.

Similar to the situation in the capital, newspapers in the provinces relied on attracting a significant number of readers, and did this. Jan Fergus’s Provincial Readers in Eighteenth-Century England constitutes a welcome addition to these debates.

Staying close to the facts about who was reading what, at least as far as the records of two [End Page ] Midlands booksellers can tell us, it offers an important correction to several inherited assumptions. Provincial readers in eighteenth-century England.

[Jan S Fergus] -- The English novel took shape in the 18th century, but no one knows who read novels like 'Humphry Clinker' & 'Clarissa' when they were first published. Darton, Children's books in England: five cenitur-ies of social life (3rd edn, Cambridge, I ).

But contrast Darton's account of the late eighteenth century with Alan Richardson, Literature, education, and romanticism: reading as social practice, II (Cambridge, I ), ch. It sets out to explore the answers to certain crucial questions about the contemporary use of books.

Following on from Professor Rivers' "Books and Their Readers in Eighteenth-century England", published in this new collection contains the results of important research by well-known specialists in the field of book publishing history.

Jan Fergus’ long-awaited book (Traister ) on Provincial Readers in Eighteenth-Century England appeared in the same year as Montoya’s essay. Fergus’ study of ‘ customers for printed matter between and ’ (1) is based on the ‘very incomplete’ (28) bookselling and circulating-library records.

“"Two decades after she edited the influential Books and Their Readers in Eighteenth-Century England (), Isabel Rivers has edited a second volume of the same kind. Each book begins with a helpful overview of the relationship of authors to the book trade in the eighteenth century the new one by James Raven.

Book Description. It was not until the eighteenth century that books became widely available throughout the whole of England. Publishing remained largely London-based, but the provincial market grew steadily in importance.

In this study, drawing on a wide range of primary sources, John Feather traces the economic, Format: Paperback. Jan Fergus - Provincial Readers in Eighteenth-Century England () код для вставки.

The market for print steadily expanded throughout the eighteenth-century Atlantic world thanks to printers' efforts to ensure that ordinary people knew how to read and use printed matter. Reading is and was a collection of practices, performed in diverse but always very specific ways.

These Cited by: 3. Karen Harvey explores the construction of sexual difference and gender identity in eighteenth-century England. Using erotic texts and their illustrations, and rooting this evidence firmly in historical context, Harvey provides a thoroughgoing critique of the orthodoxy of work on sexual difference in the history of the body.

She argues that eighteenth-century English erotic culture .,Lists for all books by Number of Ratings: 80, to 99, -to-to-to1, and more. A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

Reading All About It: Eighteenth-Century News Culture The inhabitants of provincial England certainly had access to London newspapers (some were even subscribers), but many relied on the weekly provincial press and were thus rarely exposed to the overwhelming daily or even hourly mutability of news.

the eighteenth-century press and Author: Victoria Gardner.